Model (Car) Leadership

DSN9164-2-MWhen I was a kid I built a lot of model airplanes and model cars. In 4th and 5th grades I won model car contests, although I have to admit having help from an older sibling. I also had a friend’s help. We would buy the cheapest models we could find. Then we’d build them, collect them and the make elaborate battle scenes behind our garage. We would cover everything in glue and then burn it into a trail of molten lava (plastic). Even though we didn’t really know what napalm was, we would refer to it and set fire to anything that would melt or burn. We sacrificed many models and many toy soldiers that way.

For the grade school model contests, I’d buy much nicer car models. I’d get out the parts, separate them, unfold the instructions and go to work. It wouldn’t be long before I’d go crying to my older brother for help. No matter how hard I tried, it never looked like the picture on the box. My brother, who was much more artistic and attentive to detail, would help me see my errors and correct them. Before long the car would take its proper form and we’d be satisfied. The car would sometimes look even better than the box because of some details my brother would include.

Once he helped me find a small piece of plywood and some doll rods. We painted the plywood, then covered it with pulled apart cotton balls. We took the doll rods, fashioned corner posts then connected them with some fancy yarn from my mother’s sewing supplies. After this display case was completed we set the crafted model, a copper colored 1957 Chevy, carefully in the center of the cotton. Tah Dah! Not only was it a great model, but it had a nice display. I won first place. I would have been severely disappointed with anything else.

Vision is a guiding understanding of what can be and will be accomplished. Much like the picture on the model car box, it sets the ideal. But there is danger here. Too often we get too caught up in the picture. But, the key to remember is that the vision is a work in progress. It shouldn’t be a final picture. It’s a guiding light pulling us forward and the closer we get, the easier it is to see changes. Don’t get stuck on the original vision. Rather adapt it and improve. Don’t settle for the original; always be looking to do more, accomplish more and refine more. Vision is dynamic. Great visionary leaders re-evaluate, redefine and grow the vision as the conditions dictate.

Points to Ponder –
How is vision dynamic? Can you think of a personal vision that has changed? Can you think of some important people throughout history whose vision changed?

How can focusing on to a single vision be a hindrance to success? Can you think of examples?

Can you think of a time when external forces changed an original vision for the better? For the worse?

Copyright 2014 LeadersBridge

Written by cwagganer-admin

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